National Empowerment Center

Our Mission: To carry a message of recovery, empowerment, hope and healing to people with lived experience with mental health issues, trauma, and extreme states. We carry that message with authority because we are a consumer/survivor/expatient-run organization and each of us is living a personal journey of recovery and empowerment. We are convinced that recovery and empowerment are not the privilege of a few exceptional leaders, but rather are possible for each person who has been labeled with lived experience. Whether on the back ward of a state mental institution or working as an executive in a corporation, we want people who are mental health consumers/survivors/expatients to know there is a place to turn to in order to receive the information they might need in order to regain control over their lives and the resources that affect their lives. That place is the National Empowerment Center. Information and Referral | Networking | Conference Planning | Lectures, Workshops and Consultation | Publishing and Media | Policy Issues | Representation on National Boards | Research | Development of Educational Resources| Development of Self-Help Resources Read more here: Continue Reading…

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“The Importance of User-Controlled Research on Coercion” – Jasna Russo

Coercion in psychiatry is one of the main topics in user/survivor movement worldwide. At the same time, user controlled research in this field is almost non existent. The reasons for this situation will be analysed, the need for research on coercion and the obstacles that research done by users/survivors faces. The presentation will also outline possible methodologies, their advantages and their potential. Read more here: Continue Reading…

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Adverse Childhood Experiences (ACE) Study

The ACE Study is an ongoing collaboration between the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and Kaiser Permanente. Led by Co-principal Investigators Robert F. Anda, MD, MS, and Vincent J. Felitti, MD, the ACE Study is perhaps the largest scientific research study of its kind, analyzing the relationship between multiple categories of childhood trauma (ACEs), and health and behavioral outcomes later in life. Read more here: Continue Reading…

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Center to Study Recovery in Social Contexts

The Center to Study Recovery in Social Contexts is an NIMH funded grant to investigate the well being of people with serious mental health issues, especially those who use publicly financed services in New York State. The Center applies a perspective used in economic development, Sen’s Capabilities Framework, to guide research on recovery. We examine real opportunities that people have to do and be what they value within the social contexts of resources, law, custom and policy, taking a Community Based Participatory Research approach that involves members of the mental health community in formulating research questions, designing methods of inquiry, and interpreting findings. Read more here: Continue Reading…

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Beyond Meds website

Online support for psychiatric drug withdrawal: This blog is, in part, a documentation of my journey off psychiatric medications as well as an introduction to alternative forms of care for mental health disorders regardless of whether one is on medications, off medications, or coming off medications. This blog also deals in general with socio/political and spiritual issues as they pertain to mental health and human rights issues surrounding psychiatry. For additional collections of such themed posts look at the tabs on the top of the page. It makes navigating the rest of the archives much easier. This blog also serves as a source of critical information about psychopharmaceuticals. This blog may be appropriate for anyone with any psychiatric diagnosis. All diagnosis can potentially respond to natural treatments. It’s possible for anyone to consider life without medication. This blog is a contemplation about healing ourselves through means other than medication whether you’re on medications or not. And I might add whether you choose to stay on them or not. Along with documentation of my experience this blog covers the journeys to drug freedom of many other people as well as information and resources about alternatives to standard psychiatric care. It also covers the news about drugs that allow for consideration of other options. Often drugs are most useful in crisis, but not for long-term care. Once one is aware of options one has a real choice. I didn’t have such information to make a choice when I entered the mental health system. It’s my hope that I can help people see that there are choices and alternatives. This site is in no way intended to be someone’s sole source of information for withdrawing from psych meds or for taking care of oneself with alternative means. I speak only from my own experience and am not offering advice that should be taken without professional help. That being said there is lots of Continue Reading…

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Factors Involved in Outcome and Recovery in Schizophrenia Patients Not on Antipsychotic Medications: A 15-Year Multifollow-Up Study – Harrow & Jobe

This prospective longitudinal 15-year multifollow-up research studied whether unmedicated patients with schizophrenia can function as well as schizophrenia patients on antipsychotic medications. If so, can differences in premorbid characteristics and personality factors account for this? One hundred and forty-five patients, including 64 with schizophrenia, were evaluated on premorbid variables, assessed prospectively at index hospitalization, and then followed up 5 times over 15 years. At each follow-up, patients were compared on symptoms and global outcome. A larger percent of schizophrenia patients not on antipsychotics showed periods of recovery and better global functioning (p  .001). The longitudinal data identify a subgroup of schizophrenia patients who do not immediately relapse while off antipsychotics and experience intervals of recovery. Their more favorable outcome is associated with internal characteristics of the patients, including better premorbid developmental achievements, favorable personality and attitudinal approaches, less vulnerability, greater resilience, and favorable prognostic factors. The current longitudinal data suggest not all schizophrenia patients need to use antipsychotic medications continuously throughout their lives. Read More Here: Continue Reading…

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