‘Family and Network Therapy Training for a System of Care: ‘A Pedagogy of Hope’” – Olson

In the past decade, the field of family therapy has witnessed the emergence of a new template for practice based on reflection and narrative, instead of strategy and intervention. There also are broader social and cultural frameworks, especially regarding gender and issues of social justice. The style of practice has evolved from a hierarchical one to therapeutic conversation based on collaboration. The intellectual movements of postmodernism and feminism challenged traditional cybernetic and systems models and provided the seeds for new forms of therapy. This evolving tradition as a whole can be traced back to the communication research of Gregory Bateson and his colleagues in Palo Alto.

One of the distinguishing features of postmodern therapy is the stance of treating the patient and family as members of a partnership within a network that includes the professionals and anyone else connected to the situation (Seikkula et al., 1995).

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